iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

Today we’re taking a peek at 5 reasons why iPhone and iPad users should update their iOS device to iOS 11.3 immediately. These features range from performance to autocorrect – from the most important features for the average user to features ever-so-slightly less important. No matter how you splice it, the update’s free, and it’s just about Easter weekend, so make an evening of it.

5. Performance Manager Switch

Users can access a new “Battery Health” option to stop the software’s automatic performance throttling to avoid unexpected shutdowns. This is not something I recommend doing, unless you absolutely, positively need your smartphone to run AS FAST as possible. Chances are you’re not one of the very, very few people in this world that need that top performance at all times. If you DO, head to Settings – Battery – Battery Health (Beta).

4. App Review Sorting

For those users that take their app downloading and buying seriously, sorting reviews has arrived. “Four options now allow you to sort the customer reviews on the product pages: the most useful, the most favorable, the most critical or the most recent.” Now we’ll see if people review apps with highest or lowest ratings just to top the list. That’d be not so great.

3. Name and Password Autofill inside apps

Users that don’t just log in to apps using Facebook or Twitter, there’s this. Names and Passwords can be saved to Apple’s memory for the user, then recalled in in-app web views. This applies to webpages that’ve been opened in an app, for example – now they work just like a standard browser like Safari or Chrome for autofilled names and passwords.

2. Your Health Records (Yes, really)

Inside the Health app, users are able to access their health records – just so long as your health system is in the mix. Health Records data is “encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.” This feature was previously available only to those users that’d joined the Apple Beta Software Program. A full list of institutions that are now part of this Health app initiative can be found below.

1. Autocorrect Capitalization Bug Fix

Autocorrect’s most devious plan for destroying every sentence I type included not just correcting my spelling, but adding a capital letter, too. According to the iOS 11 release notes from Apple: “Fixes a problem that could cause the capitalization of the first letter of some words by the automatic correction feature.” At last!

To update your device, head to Settings and tap General – Software Update – Download and Install. From there you should have to wait a while, tap the update button again, and you’ll be good to go.

 

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

Today we’re taking a peek at 5 reasons why iPhone and iPad users should update their iOS device to iOS 11.3 immediately. These features range from performance to autocorrect – from the most important features for the average user to features ever-so-slightly less important. No matter how you splice it, the update’s free, and it’s just about Easter weekend, so make an evening of it.

5. Performance Manager Switch

Users can access a new “Battery Health” option to stop the software’s automatic performance throttling to avoid unexpected shutdowns. This is not something I recommend doing, unless you absolutely, positively need your smartphone to run AS FAST as possible. Chances are you’re not one of the very, very few people in this world that need that top performance at all times. If you DO, head to Settings – Battery – Battery Health (Beta).

4. App Review Sorting

For those users that take their app downloading and buying seriously, sorting reviews has arrived. “Four options now allow you to sort the customer reviews on the product pages: the most useful, the most favorable, the most critical or the most recent.” Now we’ll see if people review apps with highest or lowest ratings just to top the list. That’d be not so great.

3. Name and Password Autofill inside apps

Users that don’t just log in to apps using Facebook or Twitter, there’s this. Names and Passwords can be saved to Apple’s memory for the user, then recalled in in-app web views. This applies to webpages that’ve been opened in an app, for example – now they work just like a standard browser like Safari or Chrome for autofilled names and passwords.

2. Your Health Records (Yes, really)

Inside the Health app, users are able to access their health records – just so long as your health system is in the mix. Health Records data is “encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.” This feature was previously available only to those users that’d joined the Apple Beta Software Program. A full list of institutions that are now part of this Health app initiative can be found below.

1. Autocorrect Capitalization Bug Fix

Autocorrect’s most devious plan for destroying every sentence I type included not just correcting my spelling, but adding a capital letter, too. According to the iOS 11 release notes from Apple: “Fixes a problem that could cause the capitalization of the first letter of some words by the automatic correction feature.” At last!

To update your device, head to Settings and tap General – Software Update – Download and Install. From there you should have to wait a while, tap the update button again, and you’ll be good to go.

 

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more